Myths of Parenthood

 Jose Lee  November 23, 2017


Low birth rate is one of the key future challenges in Singapore.

For a dad-to-be like me, I can understand the concerns of the millennials (also known as Generation Y) when it comes to starting a family. These are 3 common myths of parenthood nowadays in Singapore.

# Myth 1 Having a baby in Singapore is not cheap

The cost and expectation of having a baby in today context is much higher compared to our older generations. The first thought naturally would be money. For instance, each prenatal checkup typically range from $100 to $200 and estimated delivery charges at $5000 in government hospitals. Government is giving out baby bonus of $8000 to make infant and childcare affordable despite of the considerable amount of fees before the baby is born. Dismiss the myth and probably now is a good time to have baby.

# Myth 2 Scared of losing freedom with a baby

Travel and late night movies are popular hobbies in Singapore. Having a baby might trigger the change of hobbies to stay-cation and  netflixing at home. Baby sitting around the clock shows sign of losing freedom to the millennials. The sense of freedom is not lost permanently just for a good while. Learn to be productive by working less and getting more done simply get around the myth.

# Myth 3 Having kids is not the smart career choice

It is quite common to have people prioritising career over kids. Career advancement often requires extensive travel, long commutes and long work weeks that sacrifice time with kids. It is no longer just being responsible to yourself but also your family.  Singapore, known for its longest working hours in Southeast Asia is moving away from traditional work culture. Work from home and work-life balance are made possible through internet of things. Surveys indicated an increasing demand for work-life balance before job seeker accepts an offer. Ministry of Manpower (MOM) is also encouraging companies in Singapore to introduce work-life programmes within their workplace. Don’t wait until the right time in your career to have a child or it will never come.

 

I hope that this article will help couples to clear misconceptions about having a baby and start taking action. Till then, stay tuned for my upcoming post next week!

 

 

 




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2 thoughts on “Myths of Parenthood”

  1. Hello ragtoriches30,

    I am a father of two boys and I would like to recount my experience on Myth 2 – the loss of freedom with a baby.

    Time is always there in fixed quantity every hour, every day. When one prefers to spend it on priorities other than family, then time (and the corresponding loss of freedom) is true, for a baby and your spouse will definitely compete for your attention.

    When my two sons were born, I remember the hectic schedule revolving around taking care of them as well as my spouse who was recovering from childbirth. I had little free time for other pursuits.

    Even though I reminisce of the time when I was single and free of commitment, I wouldn’t trade the experience of marriage and fatherhood otherwise.

    The solution is to know your priorities and shift them accordingly.

    1. Hello Eleutherian Odyssey,

      Thanks and appreciated the fatherhood experience that was shared.

      I totally agreed with you that the experience of fatherhood is so valuable that it cannot be measured with personal freedom.

      As a dad-to-be in the next couple of weeks, I can start to feel the attention and support required of me. Therefore I started this blog in hope to strike a balance between work and family for most dads. I feel that a happy dad leads to a happy family.

      Lastly, feel free to provide any feedbacks that the blog could be improved.

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